There's coffee in that nebula



firewuurk-eyes:

saphire-dance:

I’ve decided to design a line of clothing, and I’m going to call it It Has Pockets. It’s going to be a line of simple dresses and skirts and every single one will have fucking pockets.

We should be funding this


bereweillschmidt:


lavender-ice:

what is this. magical bird.

Quetzal. That bird is a Quetzal and it can be found on Western Mexico.  It’s on a near threatened status.

bereweillschmidt:

lavender-ice:

what is this. magical bird.

Quetzal. That bird is a Quetzal and it can be found on Western Mexico.  It’s on a near threatened status.


alandistro:

electricmudpuppy:

alan lastufka is like the older more sucsessful version of me.

Or at least he is doing/has done what i want to do in life.

Older? Definitely.

More successful? I don’t know you at all, what you have or haven’t done so far… but according to your tumblr’s About Me page you are only 23 years old. I’m 31. I’ve had an extra eight adult years to learn, try, fail, and try again. That’s hardly a fair comparison for you.

When I was 23 I had done none of the things that any of my followers now know me for. I had tried and failed at the high school record label thing and that’s it. (And even that wasn’t a complete failure, we released three really good EPs, and one of our bands even got a single on the local radio stations!).

Everything else - the zine distro, my YouTube channel, the fiveawesomeguys project, my book deal, DFTBA Records, my band - all of that came after the age of 23.

So take that and run with it. You’ve got eight years to catch up to where I am now. And eight years is a looong time that can be filled with lots of cool projects, experiences, products, and successes. And yeah, probably some failures as well. But no one will remember or hear about the failures, so don’t be too afraid of them. :)


This Is What DC Thinks of Their Female Fans 

tamorapierce:

I saw this on Jezebel and simply had to share.

It’s too early on a Monday to have to put up with this shit.


therandomactorg:



“We’re doing it with the hopes that it will make somebody’s day a little brighter.”
Over one hundred handcrafted bunnies found their way to new homes thanks to Jonya Pacey and her friends. Although they live in five different states, the crafty group worked together to create dozens of stuffed bunnies to distribute in their neighborhoods for Random Acts’ Annual Melee of Kindness (AMOK) weekend.
With a little help from Random Acts, Jonya and her friends collected supplies and then started sewing. “We actually made 108 bunnies over three gatherings,” Jonya writes. “It was inspiration from the website Urban Threads called ‘The Giving Bunny Project…Basically, you make and then release these small cloth bunnies into the world for people to find and take home. We’re doing it with the hopes that it will make somebody’s day a little brighter.”






Each cloth rabbit was tied with a tag that read, “This bunny was made for you with love — you can take it home” and included details regarding Random Acts on the other side.” To read more about this amazing act of kindness, drop by our blog.
P.S. Have an idea for an awesome act of kindness? Head over and fill out an act proposal form — we offer financial assistance to those who need it to complete their equally amazing projects. 

therandomactorg:

“We’re doing it with the hopes that it will make somebody’s day a little brighter.”

Over one hundred handcrafted bunnies found their way to new homes thanks to Jonya Pacey and her friends. Although they live in five different states, the crafty group worked together to create dozens of stuffed bunnies to distribute in their neighborhoods for Random Acts’ Annual Melee of Kindness (AMOK) weekend.

With a little help from Random Acts, Jonya and her friends collected supplies and then started sewing. “We actually made 108 bunnies over three gatherings,” Jonya writes. “It was inspiration from the website Urban Threads called ‘The Giving Bunny ProjectBasically, you make and then release these small cloth bunnies into the world for people to find and take home. We’re doing it with the hopes that it will make somebody’s day a little brighter.”

Each cloth rabbit was tied with a tag that read, “This bunny was made for you with love — you can take it home” and included details regarding Random Acts on the other side.” To read more about this amazing act of kindness, drop by our blog.

P.S. Have an idea for an awesome act of kindness? Head over and fill out an act proposal form — we offer financial assistance to those who need it to complete their equally amazing projects. 


fredscience:

Lies my Textbooks Told Me: Left Brain, Right Brain
Here’s how this one goes: Some individuals are more predisposed to use the right sides of their brains, which are said to be more creatively inclined, whereas others are logical left-brainers. Maybe you were even saddled with a diagnosis of “right-brained” in elementary school and went on your whole life believing you were physiologically predisposed to be bad at math. Some people were Spock, some people were Bones, and that’s just the way it was. Guess what? It’s rubbish.
Unlike some of the myths that make their way into textbooks, this one is a credible area of study for neuroscientists. Many studies have investigated the phenomenon of brain lateralization, in which areas in the left or right hemisphere of the brain direct functions like language and visual processing. One study, published last year in the journal PLOS One, asked whether this led to some individuals using their right hemispheres more than their left, or the other way around. After imaging the brains of more than a thousand participants, they concluded that many individuals show pronounced lateralization, but it’s a localized phenomenon that can’t be generalized to the whole brain. That is, they found no evidence for creative right-brained or logical left-brained individuals, only asymmetry in small sub-networks within the brain. In fact, rather than a logical/creative duality, they found the left half of the brain handled tasks related to language and response to external stimuli, whereas the right handled more attention to external stimuli.
So if your teacher told you that you were a left-brainer and could never be an artist, you can safely forget it and paint all you like. But why would our brain split functions between its halves at all? Neuroscientists aren’t sure, but one hypothesis suggests it may give rise to different and therefore more agile approaches to processing things like language. At any rate, there’s no divide between the logical and the creative among us. Science has given us permission to be both, if we like.
[the study (open access; image is fig. 2) / read more / 2]

fredscience:

Lies my Textbooks Told Me: Left Brain, Right Brain

Here’s how this one goes: Some individuals are more predisposed to use the right sides of their brains, which are said to be more creatively inclined, whereas others are logical left-brainers. Maybe you were even saddled with a diagnosis of “right-brained” in elementary school and went on your whole life believing you were physiologically predisposed to be bad at math. Some people were Spock, some people were Bones, and that’s just the way it was. Guess what? It’s rubbish.

Unlike some of the myths that make their way into textbooks, this one is a credible area of study for neuroscientists. Many studies have investigated the phenomenon of brain lateralization, in which areas in the left or right hemisphere of the brain direct functions like language and visual processing. One study, published last year in the journal PLOS One, asked whether this led to some individuals using their right hemispheres more than their left, or the other way around. After imaging the brains of more than a thousand participants, they concluded that many individuals show pronounced lateralization, but it’s a localized phenomenon that can’t be generalized to the whole brain. That is, they found no evidence for creative right-brained or logical left-brained individuals, only asymmetry in small sub-networks within the brain. In fact, rather than a logical/creative duality, they found the left half of the brain handled tasks related to language and response to external stimuli, whereas the right handled more attention to external stimuli.

So if your teacher told you that you were a left-brainer and could never be an artist, you can safely forget it and paint all you like. But why would our brain split functions between its halves at all? Neuroscientists aren’t sure, but one hypothesis suggests it may give rise to different and therefore more agile approaches to processing things like language. At any rate, there’s no divide between the logical and the creative among us. Science has given us permission to be both, if we like.

[the study (open access; image is fig. 2) / read more / 2]


tmichaelmartin:

My new How to Adult video, on #depression and #anxiety, is my favorite one ever. Check it out @ YouTube.com/learnhowtoadult

tmichaelmartin:

My new How to Adult video, on #depression and #anxiety, is my favorite one ever. Check it out @ YouTube.com/learnhowtoadult



allrightcallmefred replied to your post “Favorite Terry Pratchett novels?”

Mort, Maskerade, Guards! Guards!, Hogfather, um a lot of them really (especially the witches and the city watch)

Awesome, I have all of these on my shelf already, and I’ve only read Mort (I think). Thank you!

allrightcallmefred replied to your post “Favorite Terry Pratchett novels?”

oh and Death all of the Death books are good. Soul Music. You’d like Susan without a doubt.

allrightcallmefred replied to your post “Favorite Terry Pratchett novels?”

oh wait I didn’t see all your tags YOU ALREADY KNOW THE DEATH ONES, GOOD. Anyway you can read them in publication order or groups (witches, Death, city watch) it doesn’t matter about the order

My friend in high school specifically introduced me to Terry Pratchett because she thought I would love Death and Susan. Susan is most definitely my favorite. I’m an adamant believer in her rule that a chocolate you didn’t intend to eat does not count. 


pixel-powered-painter:

The internet now has specific types of broken english for:

  • cats
  • dogs
  • birds

I propose we make one for snakes next.